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The woman and the ape review

Interesting and satisfying. The characters never quite came to life for me emotionally but certainly engaged me mentally. Good story and ends well which is always really difficult to do. Part cautionary tale, part love story, and part adventure story. Set in London, it concerns a new species of ape, imported by the zoologist husband of a young Danish woman, Madelene Burden. In a way

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The Woman and the Ape

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Barbara Haveland Translator.

The heroine of this love story is Madelene Burden. Lonely and disillusioned despite her upper-crust London existence, she's a modern-day sleeping beauty drowsing gently in an alcoholic stupor. But the prince whose kiss brings her to life is not tall, dark, and handsome.

He's a short, dark, pound ape named Erasmus. The victim of a smuggling attempt gone awry, Erasmus is The heroine of this love story is Madelene Burden.

The victim of a smuggling attempt gone awry, Erasmus is brought to Madelene's home; her husband, Adam, a distinguished behavioral scientist, believes the ape's sophisticated intelligence renders him more human than animal. If he is right, Erasmus would be a most lucrative addition to Adam's new zoo. But Madelene is determined to save Erasmus from a series of inhumane tests that would rob the ape of the very qualities that makes him so un-apelike.

Pursuing this goal with all the energy she had previously reserved for her drinking, Madelene's compassion turns to passion and woman and beast escape and fall in love. But Erasmus has come to England with a purpose that eventually forces the couple to face the world they have sought to flee.

Enthralling readers with the same taut prose, enigmatic characters, thrilling suspense, and satirical humor that drove Smilla to the top of bestseller lists across the country, Peter Hoeg offers a daring and imaginative fable that poses searching questions about the nature of romance, freedom and humanity.

Above all, it is a love story as erotically charged and emotionally powerful as any you will ever read. Get A Copy. Paperback , Large Print , pages. Published September 1st by Penguin Books first published More Details Original Title. Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about The Woman and the Ape , please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about The Woman and the Ape. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Start your review of The Woman and the Ape. If you approach this book as a kind of essay on the topic of animals and London in terms of how many animals are either consumed in London as food or maintained there as pets, zoological spectacles and research objects , you will find a lot to like in this book.

If you approach it as an essay on the relation of the animal world to civilized humanity, you will find perhaps less to like, but at least the outlines of a very complicated problem: should the civilized world impose some kind of limit If you approach this book as a kind of essay on the topic of animals and London in terms of how many animals are either consumed in London as food or maintained there as pets, zoological spectacles and research objects , you will find a lot to like in this book.

If you approach it as an essay on the relation of the animal world to civilized humanity, you will find perhaps less to like, but at least the outlines of a very complicated problem: should the civilized world impose some kind of limit on itself both in terms of its physical expansion and the scope of its knowledge and control vis a vis the natural world, or should civilization actively incorporate nature and preserve it "as such"? And what would the preservation be exactly?

These questions are all interesting, but this is NOT an essay. As a novel it doesn't work so well, or not as well as hoped: the characters remain vaguely sketched out, the city and settings equally vague the city itself is a strange image of London as some kind of amalgam of New York City and something like Hong Kong or Mexico City--London is a big city, so I've heard, but I can't imagine it as the massive, frenetic, sprawling, horizontal and vertical concrete jungle that Hoeg describes here.

The first half of the story if quite entertaining as the drunken wife of a rich, well-bred, important zoologist gradually figures out that she's unhappy and her husband is a monster, and that he's torturing a mysterious, illegally smuggled ape in the name of science and his career.

Once that episode is over, one is more or less waiting for the ending, which feels more cinematic and superficial than an "organic" resolution of the story and its ideas. Perhaps it's a question of genre: as a novel, the text doesn't work, but as kind of short story, allegory, or fable it might have something to say. It's a quick read in any case. One sees here and there flickers of the brilliance of Smilla's Sense of Snow.

Feb 14, Ket Lamb rated it liked it. The Woman and the Ape is about a wealthy, alcoholic housewife, Madelene, who reassess her life when an unusual ape offers her a peach. Peter Hoeg's incisive observations about class, wealth, power, freedom, civilization and beauty, keep this easily readable, animal-rights themed novel, intriguing. Madelene's annoying but unpredictable behavior adds surprising twists to what's bound to happen. You won't go bananas over the book, but the provocative ideas are rife for discussion, even if Hoeg's ta The Woman and the Ape is about a wealthy, alcoholic housewife, Madelene, who reassess her life when an unusual ape offers her a peach.

You won't go bananas over the book, but the provocative ideas are rife for discussion, even if Hoeg's take on how animals view the world isn't always accurate. Peel it and see. Mar 23, Sarah Potter rated it it was amazing. This novel deserves 10 stars, not 5! I'd never heard of the novel before, but the fact that my favourite Danish author had written it and the cover was suitably quirky not the one featured here on Goodreads, but far better , I couldn't wait to get home and start turning the book's yellowed pages.

The experience was like entering a different world and being amaz This novel deserves 10 stars, not 5! The experience was like entering a different world and being amazed at every corner turned, the beauty of the writing, the intensity, often the wit I laughed out loud many times , the total daring of the author to write something so controversial and anti-establishment.

Yes, my mouth dropped open a few times. Thoughts entered my mind such as "whoa, he's actually getting away with this", "this book must be banned in some countries", "only the Danes could be this quirky", and "how can he make something that's so taboo seem erotic?

The twists, turns, and surprises are part of its charm and excitement. I just love the main character Madelene, who's Danish, although the story is set in London. At the start of the novel, she's a secret alcoholic and a decorative wife to be wheeled out at the end of each day, to play her part in sweetening her husband's evenings and nights, and it's a part she plays well at first, until she meets an ape not an ordinary ape, mind you, but quite an exceptional one.

And so the escapade begins, full of high jinx and dare, moments of extreme tenderness, the full works. For every answer this novel gives, it poses twenty questions more. I keep having to remind myself that it's a fable, yet one that my mind keeps returning to. I've driven family, friends, acquaintances mad trying to persuade them to read it. They look at me as if to say, why would I want to read a novel about a woman and an ape?

And I can't tell them too much because to do so would take the thrill out of their reading experience should they succumb to my pleas. Many contemporary readers seem to hanker after long and longer novels.

In other words, more pages, better value for money, but this isn't always the case. Long can mean rambling, in need of editing, things better said in fewer words. The Woman and The Ape is a short novel pages in the edition I read.

The writing is tight, disciplined, and flawless, literary and yet totally unpretentious and accessible. If you're not broadminded and are easily shocked, then this isn't the novel for you. For those who love anything thought-provoking and are in possession of an extremely quirky sense of humour, then I can't recommend this novel highly enough. It's quite superb and unique. Nov 17, Jennifer rated it it was amazing. Loved this book The main character is an alcoholic housewife, Madalene, married well, who runs away with an anthropoid ape he talks named Erasmus.

Peter Hoeg is the same guy who wrote Smilla's Sense of Snow, which I liked a lot, but this is much, much better. View all 4 comments. Jun 20, Sun rated it it was ok. An ape arrives in London on a boat. Adam Burden, respected behavioural scientist, has it hidden on the grounds of his house.

His wife Madelene, is a Danish alcoholic. Somehow the author and his PR believe this makes for not only a story, but a parable. While admiring author Peter Hoeg's understanding of science, especially biology and neuroscience, and his surprising dry humour, I was ready to go where the author wanted to take me.

But I had to get off at the point where the beautiful but not qu An ape arrives in London on a boat. But I had to get off at the point where the beautiful but not quite sober wife runs off with the ape. My prejudices were stretched further by paradise found and the descent into chaos and preachy environmentalism. Madelene, a promising wildcard of a character, loses her fire and the Erasmus the ape is irritatingly noble.

An Ape Showing Humans What Humanity Is

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No-one likes to be called an animal, yet animals are what we inescapably are. And from poor frightened stuffy old Bishop Wilberforce on there have always been people who think that being an ape is worse, somehow, than being any animal at all.

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number. The story seems too locked in the world of children's fantasy to support such subversive ideology, but that is only one of the conventional assumptions that must be shed as we read this most unconventional novel.

Follow the Author

A lot of people have been waiting for Peter Hoeg's new novel, people who were captivated by the originality and wit of his ''Smilla's Sense of Snow,'' the surprise best seller of three years ago about a half-Eskimo woman from Copenhagen who solves the mystery of a small boy's death. Some of the spirit of that book has made its way into ''The Woman and the Ape,'' which also has a main female character of off-center allure. This new novel is similarly shrouded in a vague sense of mystery, and it is written with an epigrammatic grace that reveals Mr. Hoeg as a writer of an especially polished quirkiness. Hoeg's familiarly warped universe. A ship on the Thames approaches London with an ape on board ''all hunched up with its eyes closed and a blanket around its shoulders. Things go wrong. The boat runs out of control. The ape escapes, and for several chapters as his story takes shape, Mr. Hoeg has us in his spell.

The Woman and the Ape is the story of a unique and unforgettable couple—Madelene and Erasmus. Madelene—a sleeping beauty drowsing gently in an alcoholic stupor—is the beautiful and disillusioned wife of Adam Burden, a distinguished behavior scientist. Erasmus—the unlikely prince—is a pound ape. Erasmus is brought to the Burdens' London home after escaping from animal smugglers. In him Adam Burden believes he has discovered a hitherto unknown mammal, a highly intelligent anthropoid ape, the closest thing yet to a human being.

P eter Hoeg, the Danish author of the surprise international bestseller, "Smilla's Sense of Snow," has concocted a new book that's as awkward as its own half-breed protagonist. The Woman, a pampered, upper-crusty Dane named Madelene, is the wife of zookeeper Adam, and she's the only one who can save The Ape from grisly testing and permanent imprisonment.

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Dec 4, - Richard Bernstein reviews book The Woman and the Ape, by Peter Hoeg; photo (S).

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Comments: 3
  1. Tojinn

    I consider, what is it — your error.

  2. Yozshukasa

    Your idea is useful

  3. Kajiran

    You it is serious?

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