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Need for speed list

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The Need for Speed video game series is published by Electronic Arts. Games in the series were primarily developed by Canadian developer EA Canada from to After a stint with several game developers including British developer Criterion Games from through , the series is currently being handled by Swedish-British developer Ghost Games , whose debut title Need for Speed Rivals was released in Need for Speed is a series of racing video games where the main objective is to win races in a variety of game modes, in the process eluding traffic and police. Aftermarket customization of video game vehicles was an aspect first introduced by the Need for Speed series after the release of the film, The Fast and the Furious ; the feature was included in every Need for Speed title developed by EA Black Box from Need for Speed: Underground through Need for Speed: Undercover. This game was originally produced by Electronic Arts as a spin-off to the Need for Speed series, though, it was later confirmed that the game was a part of the series.

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: TOP 10 Best Need for Speed Games

Need For Speed: Heat Is The Best NFS Game In Years

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Which happened to get us thinking: in a franchise as vast and diverse as Need for Speed, which games rise to the top? The brand has hardly been a model of consistency over the years, though it's certainly also delivered its share of unforgettable, white-knuckle thrills. Thus, we set about ranking every mainline Need for Speed game.

Everything else is fair game. Here's how it all shook out. Between its dull open world, repetitive campaign events, graphics reminiscent of a mobile title and bevy of technical issues, Undercover winds up feeling like a shallow jab at replicating the success of Most Wanted, without any of that title's charm or polish. In fact, it's best described as under-cooked.

Which is strange, considering Undercover had been in development for considerably longer than the games that immediately preceded it.

And while Payback is still utterly dismal to drive, the misery is compounded by the game's unbearably overwrought card system for vehicle upgrades and heavily scripted police chases fraught with cutscenes.

This one hurts. Not since Capcom's Auto Modellista has a racing game so perfectly captured a flavor of car culture fans had been yearning for, yet been so inexplicably dreadful to play. NFS had everything going for it: a clear vision, phenomenal visuals for the time and the most powerful customization engine the series had seen up to that point.

Thematically, had the conviction to redefine Need for Speed for an exciting new era. Instead, it added yet another notch to the franchise's long list of failed reboots. At the outset, Carbon doesn't do a whole lot to distance itself from Most Wanted before it.

However, the more you play it, the more you realize it somehow also fails to recognize what made Most Wanted a fan favorite to begin with. The perpetual night setting certainly doesn't do Carbon any favors, nor does its personality-less metropolitan map that holds few, if any, memorable features.

All these years later, I can still remember my favorite cooldown spots and stretches of road in Most Wanted. Carbon, conversely, has aged into one dark, murky blur. The problem for developer Black Box proved a familiar one: half-baked physics that render certain vehicles undriveable, coupled with a predisposition for gimmicks like a minigame in which you heat up your tires before drag racing that were no replacement for a satisfying driving experience.

Certainly one of the most polarizing entries in the series, Criterion's Most Wanted is typically remembered by those who played it as Burnout Paradise with licensed cars. And while there's some merit to that assessment, it's also pretty unfair to Paradise. That game had a world teeming with exciting moments, furnished with endless, fun events and a physics engine that encouraged a will to discover.

Most Wanted has, well, none of that. But something about this take on Most Wanted fills you with that nagging feeling of a good game rushed to incompletion. There's nothing egregiously wrong with the first Need for Speed; it's just not particularly fun or noteworthy in light of the highs the franchise would rise to in the future.

Then again, it is far superior to the lows. At a time when licensed vehicles were still a rarity in racing games, The Need for Speed offered a swath of the most desirable sports cars in the world, with an attention to detail its contemporaries lacked.

The concept had some potential, but the brevity of the campaign, which clocked in at roughly four hours, coupled with an over-reliance on cutscenes, scripted segments and non-driving quick-time events, made this racer feel kind of short on actual racing. Looking back, you sort of wish there was more to do in the campaign than fulfill vague objectives, but Rivals is so strong at its core that the experience was fun even in spite of being aimless.

While the pivot to tuner culture was controversial at the time, Underground remains a competent, well put-together street racer with an inspiring customization suite, at a time when customization was priority number one for street racers. Ironically, what holds it back from a higher ranking in this list is that Underground 2 exists, and expanded on everything the first accomplished to great effect.

With High Stakes, developer EA Canada applied the original Hot Pursuit's revolutionary chase mechanic to a fully fleshed-out single-player campaign that saw players purchasing vehicles and racing for pinks for the first time in the series. In retrospect, it was a bold spin on NFS' established formula up to that point, and an astute one given how Gran Turismo established the car-PG genre the year prior.

The tracks are far too boring to justify their length, and the emphasis on gratuitous multi-race championships makes the experience feel like a slog from the very start. From a technical standpoint, High Stakes happens to be one of the franchise's high points; it's just a shame it's such a chore, too. It may be hard to recall now, but once upon a time, Need for Speed was the only game in which you could drive a Porsche, thanks to a nearly year exclusivity agreement between Electronic Arts and the famed German automaker.

Like most exclusivity deals, nothing worthwhile came of it, and EA never used the license to great effect — well, except for the one time it did. The first Hot Pursuit does everything right. The physics rank among the most intuitive and satisfying ever to grace the series. And then, last but certainly not least, there are the cop chases. Expanding upon the scope of the original, the sequel offers more varied event types, vehicles and customization options, all within an open world you want to explore.

It nails the fundamentals too, handling well and looking fantastic for the time. That's for good reason. In fact, Rockport remains one of the finest open worlds in any racer thanks to a mix of different environments, spanning dense, urban streets to winding mountain roads, that each hold something for everyone.

At its core, Need for Speed should be about two things: running from the law and trying to finish first. Hot Pursuit 2 perfected both. The pitch is remarkably simple. Offer an eclectic selection of tracks set in exotic locales, teeming with inventive track design where not a single corner or moment is wasted. And — perhaps most critically — inspire players to risk victory and freedom with a responsive physics model that is accessible yet rewarding.

Tom's Guide. Image credit: Electronic Arts Need for Speed This one hurts. NFS: Most Wanted Certainly one of the most polarizing entries in the series, Criterion's Most Wanted is typically remembered by those who played it as Burnout Paradise with licensed cars. NFS: Underground 's Underground marks the first time Need for Speed was taken in a totally new direction — a tactic Electronic Arts would repeatedly fall back on in the years following, whenever the franchise appeared to meet a creative dead end.

NFS: High Stakes With High Stakes, developer EA Canada applied the original Hot Pursuit's revolutionary chase mechanic to a fully fleshed-out single-player campaign that saw players purchasing vehicles and racing for pinks for the first time in the series.

Image credit: Electronic Arts 7. Image credit: Electronic Arts 6. Image credit: Electronic Arts 5. Image credit: Electronic Arts 3. Image credit: Electronic Arts 2. Image credit: Electronic Arts 1. Topics Gaming. See all comments 0. No comments yet Comment from the forums.

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Your question may be answered by sellers, manufacturers, or customers who purchased this item, who are all part of the Amazon community. Please make sure that you are posting in the form of a question. Please enter a question. Hustle by day and risk it all at night in need for speed heat, a white-knuckles racer that pits you against a city's rogue Police force as you battle your way into Street Racing's Elite.

The Need for Speed series is one of the most beloved racing games of all time. There are so many distinctive features that have made it what it is today: the fast cars, customization, cops, open world, etc. Image from Amazon.

Featuring all three titles release by Ghost Games. Conditions and restrictions apply. See www. Drifting is easy especially with live tuning and for you stanced and sticker nerds your covered. Theres a good amount of cars and racing is seperated into 5 categories.

The Need For Speed Games

That first two videos in that series were pretty good, but the newest video — which was posted just 15 hours ago — is downright awesome. It has everything from the initial menu, to the career mode selection, to the race selection. Once that short, 1. Later on, we join another race, this time on Krestovsky Island. The people responsible for the videos say that no laws were broken, and the speeds do appear to be legal. With that in mind, we really need to give credit to the producers — the effects, in general, are pretty amazing. How about an open-world racing game?

Need for Speed™ Ultimate Bundle

The series released its first title, The Need for Speed , in The most recent game, Need for Speed Heat , was released on November 8, The series has been overseen and had games developed by multiple notable teams over the years including EA Black Box and Ghost Games. The franchise has been critically well received and is one of the most successful video game franchises of all time, selling over million copies of games. The company capitalized on its experience in the domain by developing the Need for Speed series in late

When it comes to video games aimed at car enthusiasts, no other series brings back feelings of nostalgia better than Need for Speed. There was nothing like running home from the bus stop after school and popping a game disc into your Xbox so you could rip through the fictional streets of Rockport — truly a simpler time.

Which happened to get us thinking: in a franchise as vast and diverse as Need for Speed, which games rise to the top? The brand has hardly been a model of consistency over the years, though it's certainly also delivered its share of unforgettable, white-knuckle thrills. Thus, we set about ranking every mainline Need for Speed game. Everything else is fair game.

Category:Need for Speed games

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On October 21, , Electronic Arts announced the franchise had sold over million units, making Need for Speed the most commercially successful racing game series at the time, and Need for Speed: Most Wanted being the best selling game in the series with 16 million copies sold. Some entries in the Need for Speed series were sold through retail as boxed products with a unique edition alongside its regular boxed counterpart or re-released as a boxed unique special edition that included additional content. Some entries in the Need for Speed series were sold with downloadable content available through online stores that would include additional content for a regular edition of a game. Many games in the Need for Speed series are localised for multiple languages, but some unique localisations are re-releases that include altered content for promotional purposes in the region, are released only for a specific region, or have been edited into a region specific product. Multiple games in the Need for Speed series have been adapted into coin operated arcade cabinets by Global VR.

The top five greatest ‘Need for Speed’ games

Here's everything you need to know about NFS Payback, from release date and system requirements to the car list, and more. The last game's PC version was delayed for a year, so getting it on PC along with the rest is a good development. Purchasing this allows three-day early access, from November 7. Need for Speed Payback is around According to developer Ghost Games, this configuration allows for gameplay at p x pixels at 30 frames per second at low settings. According to developer Ghost Games, this configuration allows for gameplay at p x pixels at 60 frames per second at high settings.

Nov 27, - Need for Speed Heat brings the year-old racing franchise back to Sadly, you won't find any Toyotas on the list, which means no Supra or  Rating: 4 - ‎Review by Ben Moore.

K-A Action, Family, Sport. The first part of legendary journey begins from choosing tracks, selecting cars and escaping police. It all started here, in the middle of the s.

See all 19 photos. Since Need for Speed Carbon 's release in , successive new titles have struggled to live up to the earlier games' appeal. Recent offerings such as Rivals and Most Wanted left fans looking back and wanting more.

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Comments: 4
  1. Daibei

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  2. Tazahn

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  3. Kazralabar

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  4. Goltitaxe

    I can ask you?

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