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A man who came to dinner

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Just in time to slip under the wire as the niftiest comedy of to date , the Warners' meticulous screen version of the George S. Any one who happened to miss the original acid-throwing antic on the stage—and any one, for that matter, who happened not to have missed it—should pop around, by all means, and catch the cinematic reprise. For here, in the space of something like an hour and fifty-two minutes, is compacted what is unquestionably the most vicious but hilarious cat-clawing exhibition ever put on the screen, a deliciously wicked character portrait and a helter-skelter satire, withal. Perhaps motion-picture audiences, in their oft-alleged innocence, will fail to perceive the mimicry supposedly implied in this film—the fact that the leading character, according to the Broadway Nestors, is but a thinly veiled impersonation of a writer and critic of portly frame who lectures for fabulous tributes and is called the Towncrier on the air. Maybe they won't even get it.

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: LUX RADIO THEATER: MAN WHO CAME TO DINNER - CLIFTON WEBB AND LUCILLE BALL

Playhouse schedules starry reading of ‘The Man Who Came to Dinner’

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The screenplay by Julius and Philip G. The supporting cast features Jimmy Durante and Billie Burke. While passing through small-town Ohio during a cross-country lecture tour, notoriously acerbic New York radio personality Sheridan Whiteside Monty Woolley breaks his hip after slipping and falling on the icy steps of the house of the Stanleys Grant Mitchell and Billie Burke , a prominent Ohio family with whom he's supposed to dine as a publicity stunt.

He insists on recuperating in their home during the Christmas holidays. The overbearing, self-centered celebrity soon comes to dominate the lives of the residents and everyone else who enters the household. He encourages young adults Richard Russell Arms and June Elisabeth Fraser Stanley to pursue their dreams, much to the dismay of their conventional father Ernest.

When Bert reads her his play, she is so impressed she asks Whiteside to show it to his contacts and then announces she will quit his employment and marry Bert. However, her boss is loath to lose such an efficient aide and does his best to sabotage the blossoming romance. He also exaggerates the effects of his injuries to be able to stay in the house. He suggests actress Lorraine Sheldon Ann Sheridan would be perfect for one of the leading roles, intending to have her steal Bert away from Maggie.

Lorraine convinces Bert to spend time with her to fix up the play. When Maggie realizes Whiteside is behind the underhanded scheme, she quits. Somewhat chastened, Whiteside concocts a plan to get Lorraine out of the way, with the help of his friend Banjo Jimmy Durante.

Finally fed up with his shenanigans, meddling, insults, and unbearable personality, Mr. Stanley swears out a warrant ordering Whiteside to leave in 15 minutes.

However, with seconds to spare, Whiteside blackmails Mr. Stanley into dropping the warrant, and allowing his children to do as they please by threatening to reveal Stanley's sister Harriet's past as an infamous axe murderess.

As Whiteside departs, he falls on the Stanley's icy steps again and is carried back inside, much to Stanley's consternation. Four of the leading characters are based on real-life personalities.

She urged Jack L. Warner to purchase the screen rights for herself and John Barrymore. He tested for the role of Whiteside but was deemed unsuitable when, as a result of his heavy drinking or perhaps encroaching Alzheimers , he supposedly had difficulty delivering the complicated, fast-paced dialogue, even with his lines posted on cue cards throughout the set.

Wallis thought the former was "overblown and extravagant" and the latter "too mild mannered. Bette Davis was unhappy with the casting of Woolley. In later years, she observed, "I felt the film was not directed in a very imaginative way. For me, it was not a happy film to make; that it was a success, of course, did make me happy. I guess I never got over my disappointment in not working with the great John Barrymore.

Bosley Crowther of The New York Times observed, "Any one who happened to miss the original acid-throwing antic on the stage — and any one, for that matter, who happened not to have missed it — should pop around, by all means, and catch the cinematic reprise. For here, in the space of something like an hour and fifty-two minutes, is compacted what is unquestionably the most vicious but hilarious cat-clawing exhibition ever put on the screen, a deliciously wicked character portrait and a helter-skelter satire, withal.

His zest for rascality is delightful, he spouts alliterations as though he were spitting out orange seeds, and his dynamic dudgeons in a wheelchair are even mightier than those of Lionel Barrymore. A more entertaining buttinsky could hardly be conceived, and a less entertaining one would be murdered on the spot. One palm should be handed Bette Davis for accepting the secondary role of the secretary, and another palm should be handed her for playing it so moderately and well.

But even if you don't catch all of it, you're sure to get your money's worth. It makes laughing at famous people a most satisfying delight. Variety made note of the "superb casting and nifty work by every member of the company" and thought the "only detracting angle in the entire film is [the] slowness of the first quarter.

Time stated, "Woolley plays Sheridan Whiteside with such vast authority and competence that it is difficult to imagine anyone else attempting it" and added, "Although there is hardly room for the rest of the cast to sandwich in much of a performance between this fattest of fat parts, Bette Davis, hair up, neuroses gone, is excellent as Woolley's lovesick secretary. Time Out London said, "It's rather unimaginatively directed, but the performers savour the sharp, sparklingly cynical dialogue with glee.

The film has an English audio track and subtitles in English, Spanish, and French. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Ernest Stanley George Barbier as Dr. Dudley Dickerson Harry, the Baggage Clerk Roland Drew Reporter Ernie Adams Michaelson Leslie Brooks Hollywood Blonde Georgia Carroll Hollywood Blonde Bess Flowers Fan at Train Station Florence Wix Fan at Train Station Leah Baird Fan at Train Station Lottie Williams Fan at Train Station Sol Gorss Chauffeur Beal Wong Chinese Guest Kam Tong Chinese Guest Creighton Hale Radio Man Hank Mann Expressman Eddy Chandler Guard Fred Kelsey Detective Frank Mayo Plainclothesman Jack Mower Plainclothesman Alix Talton Chorus Girl Frank Moran Retrieved New York: Hawthorn Books Films directed by William Keighley.

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Epstein Films with screenplays by Philip G. Epstein Warner Bros. Hidden categories: Articles with short description Template film date with 1 release date Pages using infobox film with deprecated parameters All articles with unsourced statements Articles with unsourced statements from February Commons category link is on Wikidata.

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Show Information. Kaufman and Hart's broad satire on the bizarre world of internationally famous critic Alexander Woollcott, here called Sheridan Whiteside Greg Martin , when his egocentric life collides with the day to day humdrum lives of the Stanley family of Mesalia, Ohio in is rarely produced due to its large cast of wildly divergent characters and dated humor. Funny it is, exceedingly funny, but only to those who understand the references to the events and people of the 30s. Now, in a finely staged production at Actors Co-op, The Man Who Came to Dinner, like the playwrights' other smash hit You Can't Take It With You, shows just how dull life would be without flagrant eccentricity and staunch individuality. Almost 40 years have gone by, and the chuckles and chortles keep coming.

Famous, or infamous, radio personality Sheridan Whiteside Monty Woolley has stopped in Ohio while on his cross-country tour, where he pays a visit to local notables, the Stanleys Grant Mitchell, Billie Burke. He slips on ice on the steps to their home and insists on staying with them while recuperating from his injuries. Through a series of hijinks involving a host of colorful characters, the division between Sheridan and Maggie grows, until Maggie reaches her final straw.

The screenplay by Julius and Philip G. The supporting cast features Jimmy Durante and Billie Burke. While passing through small-town Ohio during a cross-country lecture tour, notoriously acerbic New York radio personality Sheridan Whiteside Monty Woolley breaks his hip after slipping and falling on the icy steps of the house of the Stanleys Grant Mitchell and Billie Burke , a prominent Ohio family with whom he's supposed to dine as a publicity stunt. He insists on recuperating in their home during the Christmas holidays.

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Join the Steppenwolf Email List. Synopsis Opened April 26, When the irascible Sheridan Whiteside, famous Manhattan radio star and critic, slips outside the Stanley home, the family has to put him up - and put up with him - over Christmas. Pompous and cunning, Whiteside completely takes over the house for his broadcasts, encourages the Stanley kids to defy their parents, attracts assorted wacky friends and receives tons of fan mail and strange gifts. When his faithful secretary Maggie falls for local reporter and would-be playwright Bert Jefferson, Whiteside pulls out all the stops to block the romance, including using glamorous Lorraine Sheldon to divert Bert. James Burrows, creator of TV's Cheers directs this classic American comedy of errors which tells the wacky tale of a dinner guest who wouldn't leave. Find out more about our productions that traveled beyond Chicago. Content Advisory Steppenwolf does not offer advisories about subject matter, as sensitivities vary from person to person. If you have any questions about content, age-appropriateness or stage effects such as strobe lights or theatrical fog that might have a bearing on patron comfort, please contact the box office at

MAN WHO CAME TO DINNER 1942 (Part 1 of 8)

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The Man Who Came to Dinner

An acerbic critic wreaks havoc when a hip injury forces him to move in indefinitely with a Midwestern family. Jack L. Warner Hal B.

Watch now. Popular and beautiful Fanny Trellis is forced into a loveless marriage with an older man, Jewish banker Job Skeffington, in order to save her beloved brother Trippy from an embezzlement charge, and predictable complications result. The ruthless, moneyed Hubbard clan lives in, and poisons, their part of the deep South at the turn of the twentieth century. A financially-strapped charter pilot hires himself to an oil tycoon to kidnap his madcap daughter and prevent her from marrying a vapid band leader. The arrival of an ex-lover on a young woman's wedding day sets in motion a chain of events which will alter her and her cousin's lives forever.

The Man Who Came to Dinner (disambiguation)

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Popular and beautiful Fanny Trellis is forced into a loveless marriage with an older man, Jewish banker Job Skeffington, in order to save her beloved brother  Rating: /10 - ‎6, votes.

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